Red Watermelons & Blue Agaves

Mexican Art of the Aztecs to the Golden Age of Calendar Art

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ~ Multi-Cultural Specific (1 Salary Point)

*Subject to change

This course will give teachers an overview of 1000 years of Mexican art and will tie these topics to the California Content Standards in visual arts, social studies, history and multi-cultural programming K-12. Classes will be fun, fast paced, information packed with lots of slides and video presentations and unique art projects.

Attendance: Participants will attend two eight-hour weekend workshops (participate in class and complete all art projects) AND complete required homework within 30 days from the end of the class. Classes will be fun, fast paced, information packed with lots of slides, video presentations and unique art projects. Punctuality is appreciated!

PowerPoint: Teachers will sharpen their skill and make a PowerPoint presentation for use in their class. Digital camera is necessary for the homework, so make arrangements for a camera or borrow one from a friend or from your school before class begins. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed. Most schools have this.

Art Projects* You will make some interesting art projects: tin ex-votos, wood block prints (Guadalupe Posada), Oaxacan collage (Rodolfo Morales), Self-portrait (Frida Kahlo).

Teachers will receive an informative notebook.

Locations of Workshops: The Los Angeles Arboretum is co-sponsoring this workshop. Registration will include entrance to the beautiful grounds of the Arboretum. Class will be held in a large community room and there is ample parking. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to class time. Some special field trips may be scheduled, see course details.

Lunch: Bring a brown bag lunch as we will have a "working lunch" which will count towards class hours. An assortment of sodas and waters will be provided.

Cost: $95 and a materials charge of $35 to cover four art projects to take back to the classroom.

Pre-registration is required and can be completed by using our secure internet shopping cart. A week before the class, you will be sent a class confirmation, credit card receipt for return of packing charge, map to the Arboretum and a class checklist by return mail. Receipts for reimbursement or taxes will be provided--please keep them-- as we cannot provide receipts after class date! Class space is limited so early enrollment is advised.

Cancellations may be made up to 7 days prior to class date. Refund will be made minus a $25 service charge. No refunds will be given for cancellations that occur with less than 7 days prior notice.

A "Mercado" table will be set up for those wanting to purchase books, videos, folk art, papel picado banners, sugar skull molds and decorating supplies and educational materials for your classrooms or homework projects. Cash or credit cards accepted.

Course Objectives:
1. Learn what characteristics of Mexican art are indigenous to Mexico, both ancient and contemporary, and how they were influenced by European and Iberian art.

2. Investigate ways to use art to teach other disciplines and recognize the contributions of indigenous and ethnic Mexican artists. Learn effective methods of using art projects to reinforce and cultivate cultural pride and create an appreciation for Mexican culture.

3. Learn about the particular histories of significant Mexican artists and how they overcame class struggle and racial prejudice to express themselves, their cultural identity and their political commentary through their art. Indigenous and women's art will be emphasized.

4. Learn methods of using PowerPoint presentations to make interesting & effective classroom presentations. Digital camera is required. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed.

5. This course is designed to provide participants with a better understanding of how Mexican art can be used in a curriculum for social studies, English language arts or visual arts. In addition, participants will utilize the California Content Standards to design interdisciplinary and thematic lessons for use with their student populations including English language learners (ELL), standard English learners, culturally diverse and special needs students.

Course Outline:

First Morning Session
Pre-Conquest to Colonial Period.

Art of the Aztecs, Maya, Zapotec and other cultures will be examined. Spanish and European influences of the post-Conquest will be viewed through objects like Talavera pottery, retablos, ex-votos, santos and Mexican mask making for religious festivals will be discussed before lunch. Video. Power Points.

Art project - Hands-on making of a tin ex-voto. Appropriate for students K -12.

Lunch - Demonstrate art project during working lunch period.

Afternoon Session
Mexico 1850 - 1910

After lunch, the subject matter will focus on the Mexican Colonial art, including the European Realism, "Casta" paintings, the use of the Virgin of Guadalupe as a patriotic symbol of Independence (tattoo art) and the School of San Carlos. Political satire wood block prints of Jose Guadalupe Posada of the late 19th century will preview the art project.
Video. Power Points.

Art project* - Kid friendly wood block cuts. Carve the block with your design, ink the block and press to make a card
or fan-folded codex.

Early Mexican photography of the 19th century and the art of the Porfiriato will be discussed and viewed. The day will conclude with a technical PowerPoint lesson designed to demonstrate how to make these effective presentations for the classroom. Video. Power Points.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework Assignment & PowerPoint presentations.


Second Morning Session
Mexican Revolution, National Identity &
Muralists Period

Post-Revolutionary period is highlighted by the brilliant concepts of Jose Vasconcelos who created a new national identity by uniting Mexico with art, music, literature, shared symbols, and founding the era of public mural painters (Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco and David Siquerios). A film featuring the work of Russian cinematographer Sergio Eisenstein (1929) and his creation of the stylized Mexican will be shown. History of Frida Kahlo, Tina Midoti, Alvaro Bravo will be shown. Videos & PowerPoints.

Art project* - Self-portrait art exercise in the style of Frida Kahlo. Students should bring a close-up photo of themselves to serve as inspiration!

Lunch - Watch participant's homework PowerPoint presentations which was first week's homework.

Afternoon Session
Contemporary Mexican art 1940 - 2000

PowerPoint presentation on my book, Mexican Calendar Girls, showing original vintage calendar art followed by discussion of commercial Mexican graphic arts and how it was used as a tool of national identity.


Work and histories of Rufino Tamayo, Francisco Toledo, the Oaxacan school of Art including Arnufo Mendoza, Enrique Flores, Rodolfo Morales and Juan Alcazar will bring us to the end of the 20th Century. Video. Power Points.

Art Project* - Collage project inspired by the work of Rodolfo Morales.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework

Homework*

Homework (30 hours) will consist of :

1. Make a 15 minute PowerPoint presentation related to one general Mexican art topic listed below.
Emphasis should be placed on historical accuracy of the topic and how it relates to class and race prejudice and cultural tolerance. Topics from which to choose are:

  a. Mexican symbols of the pre-Conquest, Colonial and post-Revolutionary periods; or 

  b. Analyze 5 wall murals in Los Angeles and compare and contrast them with artist's work studied in this workshop and analyze the origins and themes of the murals selected; or

  c. Pick 12 - 15 contemporary graphic art images with Mexican themes (advertisements, product labels etc) and evaluate them in terms of art style, symbols and stereotypes.

Include titles and label your disc, and submit your completed disc as homework.

2. Complete all art projects in class.

3. Using the workshop contents, complete a 1 week lesson plan based on their grade level curriculum, using the applicable state standards for your project. This may be integrated and married into a lesson plan using Open Court or other mandated curriculum courses if you like.

4. Complete an Evaluation of this course.

5. Submit all homework, #1 through #5, within 30 days of the last class. All items must be mailed to: Reign Trading Co. Angela Villalba, 3838 Walnut Grove Ave, Rosemead, CA 91770. Make sure to fully identify yourself, the class taken and include the homework worksheet with your box. Include a check for $10 if you want your items returned.

*Subject to change. This course outline gives a general idea as to the course content, order and art projects, but it may vary slightly in actuality.



Cascading Sugar Skulls
Day of the Dead - America's newest holiday

Mexican Holiday to Honor Beloved Ancestors

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ~ Multi-Cultural Specific (1 Salary Point)

*Subject to change

This course will give teachers an understanding of the historical and cultural significance of Day of the Dead. We will focus on how the holiday is celebrated in Mexico by observing holiday preparations in the home and the traditional community celebrations in the village cemeteries. This multi-cultural holiday is quickly becoming a popular holiday in the United States as schools around the country participate in the celebrations through art projects, sugar skull decorating, events and ofrenda (altar) building. Age appropriate art projects will be discussed as well as holiday foods and regional specialties.

Day of the Dead history, folk art, crafts and customs will tie these topics to the California Content Standards in visual arts, social studies, history and multi-cultural programming K-12. Participants will complete the workshop with an understanding of how to implement a Day of the Dead program in their school.

Attendance
Participants will attend two eight-hour weekend workshops (participate in class and complete all art projects) AND complete required homework within 30 days from the end of the class. Classes will be fun, fast paced, information packed with lots of slides, video presentations and unique art projects. Punctuality is appreciated!

PowerPoint
Teachers will learn how to make PowerPoint presentations for use in their classes. Digital camera is necessary for the homework, so make arrangements for a camera or borrow one from a friend or from your school before class begins. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed. Most schools have this.

Art projects*
Decorate sugar skulls, altar building, wood block prints, retablos, papel picado banners, paper flowers and classroom traditional fiesta foods.
Teachers will receive an informative notebook.

Locations of Workshops
The Los Angeles Arboretum is co-sponsoring this workshop. Registration will include entrance to the beautiful grounds of the Arboretum. Class will be held in a large community room and there is ample parking. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to class time.
The special Field Trip class in October will include a visit to the FOREVER CEMETARY in Hollywood. (Your personal transportation). Details given during first session. The class sessions will be adjusted to make the time available for the visit to the cemetary displays.

Lunch
Bring a brown bag lunch
as we will have a "working lunch" which will count towards class hours. An assortment of sodas and waters will be provided.

Cost
$95 and a materials charge of $35 to cover four art projects to take back to the classroom.

Pre-registration is required and can be completed by using our secure internet shopping cart. You will be sent a class confirmation, credit card receipt for return of packing charge, map to the Arboretum and a class checklist by return mail. Receipts for reimbursement or taxes will be provided--please keep them-- as we cannot provide receipts after class date! Class space is limited so early enrollment is advised.

Cancellations may be made up to 7 days prior to class date. Refund will be made minus a $25 service charge. No refunds will be given for cancellations that occur with less than 7 days prior notice.

A "Mercado" table will be set up for those wanting to purchase books, videos, folk art, papel picado banners, sugar skull molds and decorating supplies and educational materials for your classrooms or homework projects. Cash or credit cards accepted.

Course Objectives

  1. Explore the meaning of Day of the Dead in Mexico and the United States.

  2. Investigate ways to use Day of the Dead to teach other disciplines such as reading, writing, art, history and multi-cultural programs. Use Day of the Dead to create collaborative art presentations and multi-grade school celebrations. Discuss the importance of honoring the dead in any culture. Internet research projects will be explored and discussed.

  3. Learn authentic classroom activities and strategies that will counter stereotypes, create cultural tolerance and an appreciation for Mexican culture. Learn effective methods of using these concepts and projects to reinforce and cultivate cultural pride create an appreciation for Mexican culture.

  4. Explore the geographic differences in Day of the Dead as well as the unique cultural differences. Note how Mexican immigrants have brought this important holiday to the United States in order to express themselves and maintain their cultural identity. Indigenous and women's contributions to the holiday will be emphasized.

  5. Learn methods of using PowerPoint presentations to make interesting & effective classroom presentations. Digital camera is required. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed.

  6. This course is designed to provide participants with a better understanding of how Day of the Dead can be used in a curriculum for social studies, English language arts or visual arts. In addition, participants will utilize the California Content Standards to design interdisciplinary and thematic lessons for use with their student populations including English language learners (ELL), standard English learners, culturally diverse and special needs students.

Course Outline

(Full day, 8 hour classes will complete sessions A&B the first day and C&D the next meeting day. If you choose a 4 hour format, one session will be completed each day.)

Session A - Pre-Conquest to Colonial Period

A short Day of the Dead video, filmed in Oaxaca, will begin the day followed by a lecture about the Aztecs and other ancient Mexican cultures that celebrated and honored the dead before the Spanish Conquest. These traditions will be contrasted with the Spanish and European religious influences which dominated and transformed Mexico after the Conquest. Day of the Dead in the post-Conquest period will be viewed through objects like retablos, ex-votos, death photography and paintings, Mexican masks, dances, fiestas and calavera satirical political poetry.

Art project* Retablo making, honoring a historical figure. Group student exhibit will be discussed. Appropriate for kids K -12.

Lunch - First half of the movie of Macario with Ignacio Lopez Tarzo.

Session B - Day of the Dead in the 1900's ~ Wood cuts & PowerPoint

After lunch, the subject matter will focus on the political satire wood block prints of Jose Guadalupe Posada (1850-1913) and his contribution to Day of the Dead art work. Learn about "calaveras", the satirical poems of the Victorian period. Continue discussing the contemporary Day of the Dead traditions in the different regions of Mexico and within different economic and racial classes. Day of the Dead folk art will be shared from Villalba's collection. Video & PowerPoints.

Art project* - Kid friendly block wood cuts in the style of Posada. Engrave and carve the wood block, ink it and press onto paper, making a nice art print.

Second art project*: traditional papel picado banner cutting.

Traditions in the preparations, foods, folk art, home celebrations, cemetery decoration and fiestas will be explained. Folk art will be shown with emphasis on the most famous Day of the Dead Mexican artists.

The day will conclude with a technical PowerPoint lesson designed to demonstrate how to make effective Day of the Dead presentations for the classroom.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework Assignment & PowerPoint presentations.

Session C - How to Celebrate Day of the Dead in your school

We will begin the session with a walk through the Arboretum with a staff expert who will show us the Mexican botanical collection. He will assist us in cutting sugar cane for our ofrenda building. PowerPoint presentation on public ofrendas will be shown.

This session will explain school and classroom Day of the Dead celebrations and grade appropriate art projects. Technical advice on Ofrenda altar building will be given as the group builds an ofrenda with "hands on" experience.

Art Project* Participants will make papel picado banners and paper flowers, traditional for the holiday.

Lunch - Watch second half of Macario.

Session D - Contemporary Mexican Art 1940 - 2000

Discuss how Day of the Dead has evolved into a meaningful American holiday. Discuss the importance of special foods at holidays and which modified recipes can be made in the classroom. Angela will share personal stories of Day of the Dead from her travels (16 years of Day of the Dead in Oaxaca) while she was making documentaries and working with indigenous people in small villages. History and a video of the handmade sugar skulls will be presented.

View several of the participant's PowerPoint presentations.

Art Project* - Sugar Skull decoration. Make large quantity batch of sugar mix and decorate sugar skulls to take home.
Discuss logistics and tips to make a successful project in the classroom.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework

Homework*

Homework (30 hours) will consist of :

  1. Ask your students if they celebrate Day of the Dead at home, and if so, how? Compile your results.

  2. Make a 15 minute PowerPoint presentation on one Mexican topic listed below.
    Emphasis should be placed on historical accuracy of the topic and how it relates to class and race prejudice and cultural tolerance. Topics from which to choose are:

    • Day of the Dead in the United States

    • Day of the Dead - Celebrations in Mexico

    • Day of the Dead Folk Art

    • Comparison of Day of the Dead celebrations in other foreign cultures

    Include text or titles, label your disc and submit your completed PowerPoint presentation homework.

  3. Complete all art projects. You may send your original artwork or send photos or digital disc of your completed work.
    If you submit your artwork, make sure to label or attach identification tags to your pieces.

  4. Using the workshop contents, complete a 1 week lesson plan based on your grade level curriculum, using the applicable state standards for your project. This may be integrated into a lesson plan using Open Court or other mandated curriculum courses if you prefer.

  5. Pick two states of Mexico and compare and contrast their Day of the Dead traditions with respect to legends, foods, style, activities, ofrendas and symbolism. Write an essay with your findings. May use Mary Andrade's Day of the Dead books for this assignment.

  6. Complete an Evaluation of this course.

Submit all homework, #1 through #6, within 30 days of the last class.
All items must be mailed to: Reign Trading Co. Angela Villalba, 3838 Walnut Grove Ave, Rosemead, CA 91770.
Make sure to fully identify yourself, the class taken and include the homework worksheet with your box.
Include a check for $10 if you want your items returned.

*Subject to change. This course outline gives a general idea as to the course content, order and art projects, but it may vary slightly in actuality.


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Useful art of everyday life in color, whimsy & imagination


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ~ Multi-Cultural Specific (1 Salary Point)

*Subject to change

This course will give teachers an understanding of Mexican folk art and its historical function in village life. Emphasis will be placed on regional ethnic groups (such as the Tarahumara, Huichol and Zapotec Indians) as well as distinctive geographic regional folk art (such as differences between Oaxacan, Michoacan and Guerrero pottery). We will use videos, PowerPoint and Show & Tell to highlight many types of folk art: paper, masks, basketry, carving, pottery, jewelry, papier mache, gourds, instruments, weaving, as well as natural dyes.

By studying folk art, participants will understand how Mexico is a huge patchwork of distinctive ethnic and geographic groups, different classes--all with different styles of folk art. Discussion will explain the difference between folk art, "tourist art" and contemporary crafts. Customs, dances, festivals, religious beliefs, style of dress and kitchen tools are also reflected in a region's folk art.

History of the evolution of folk art, as well as a focus on individual famous folk artists, will tie these topics to the California Content Standards in visual arts, social studies, history and multi-cultural programming K-12.

Attendance: Participants will attend two eight-hour weekend workshops (participate in class and complete all art projects) AND complete required homework within 30 days from the end of the class. Classes will be fun, fast paced, information packed with lots of slides, video presentations and unique art projects. Punctuality is appreciated!

PowerPoint: Teachers will learn how to make PowerPoint presentations for use in their classes. Digital camera is necessary for the homework, so make arrangements for a camera or borrow one from a friend or from your school before class begins. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed. Most schools have this available to teachers.

Art projects*: Huichol beaded animals, Oaxacan wood alebrije sculpture, dynamic natural red watercolor card (made from ground up cochineal bugs), decorated gourd rattle or woven basket and papel picado banners.

*art projects subject to change.

Teachers will receive an informative notebook.

Locations of Workshops: The Los Angeles Arboretum is co-sponsoring this workshop. Registration will include entrance to the beautiful grounds of the Arboretum. Class will be held in a large community room and there is ample parking. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to class time.

Lunch: Bring a brown bag lunch as we will have a "working lunch" which will count towards class hours. An assortment of sodas and waters will be provided.

Cost: $95 and a materials charge of $35 to cover four art projects to take back to the classroom.

Pre-registration is required and can be completed by using our secure internet shopping cart. You will be sent a class confirmation, credit card receipt for return of packing charge, map to the Arboretum and a class checklist by return mail. Receipts for reimbursement or taxes will be provided--please keep them-- as we cannot provide receipts after class date! Class space is limited so early enrollment is advised.

Cancellations may be made up to 7 days prior to class date. Refund will be made minus a $25 service charge. No refunds will be given for cancellations that occur with less than 7 days prior notice.

A "Mercado" table will be set up for those wanting to purchase books, videos, folk art, papel picado banners, sugar skull molds and decorating supplies and educational materials for your classrooms or homework projects. Cash or credit cards accepted.

Course Objectives:
1. Explore the meaning of Mexican "folk art".

2. Investigate ways to use folk art to teach other disciplines and recognize the contributions of indigenous and ethnic Mexican artists. Learn about the particular histories of significant Mexican folk artists and how they overcame class struggle and racial prejudice to express themselves, their cultural identity and their political commentary through their art. Indigenous and women's folk art will be emphasized.

3. Learn methods of using PowerPoint presentations to make interesting & effective classroom presentations. Digital camera is required. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed.

4. Learn effective methods of using folk art projects to reinforce and cultivate cultural pride, stimulate discussion about how racial stereotypes originate and create an appreciation for Mexican culture.

5. This course is designed to provide participants with a better understanding of how Mexican folk art can be used in a curriculum for social studies, English language arts, visual arts or multi-cultural studies. In addition, participants will utilize the California Content Standards to design interdisciplinary and thematic lessons for use with their student populations including English language learners (ELL), standard English learners, culturally diverse and special needs students.


Course Outline: (Full day, 8 hour classes will complete sessions A&B the first day and C&D the next meeting day. If you choose a 4 hour format, one session will be completed each day)

Session A
Utilitarian nature of folk art

Discuss the definition of folk art and show examples of folk art from around Mexico. Pieces from Villalba's personal collection: masks, weavings, textiles, pottery and religious pieces as well as early 1900's photography will enhance the discussion. Villalba, a direct folk art importer from the Indian regions of Southern Mexico for 16 years, will share personal stories from her experiences. Historical
references to 18th century trade routes and folk art history will provide the basis for the following lectures. Participants will visit the Arboretum specialized Mexican gardens, gourd garden and basket weaver's garden.
PowerPoint presentation or video highlighting Mexican folk artists will be shown.

Art project* - Gourd rattle or woven basket

Lunch - Demonstrate art project during the lunch period.

Session B
Ethnic Distinctions

The subject matter will focus on the ethnic regionalism of folk art. Focus will be on weaving, clothing and pottery as well as regional identification. Participants will learn about the vanishing Huichol Indian tribes of Nyarit and Jalisco and their folk art traditions which have gone virtually unchanged since the pre-Conquest times. Video & PowerPoints.

Art project* - Huichol beaded carved animal with cera campeche wax.

The day will conclude with a technical PowerPoint lesson designed to demonstrate how to make effective PowerPoint presentations for the classroom. Participants will begin their PowerPoint presentations in order to show at our next session.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework Assignment & PowerPoint presentations.

Session C
Weaving & Natural dyes


History of Mexican paper, or amate, will be explained and how it was used in early Mexican shamanic and witchcraft practices. Mexican paper making will be demonstrated. Video on cochineal bug dye will be shown explaining its ancient history to contemporary women's co-op's that cultivate it in Oaxacan villages. Video & PowerPoints.

Art project* - Papel picado banners for the classroom. Natural dye watercolors.

Lunch - Watch participant's homework PowerPoint presentations.

Session D
Contemporary Folk art , Famous artists

Contemporary folk art is a Mexican tradition and employs thousands of artists in all parts of Mexico. Their art sells and is exhibited worldwide. The government of Mexico promotes folk artist's work through their Fonart agency as well as the National Institute of the Indigenous. Villalba will comment on the best folk art museums in the U.S. and Mexico, folk art clubs, places to buy folk art, collection information, internet companies and great projects for the classroom including kid's folk art exhibits. Video & PowerPoints.

Work and histories of Josefina Aguilar, Felipe Linares, Teodora Blanca, Heron Martinez, Manuel Jimenez, Juan Horta, Castillo family, Sorteno family and Ortega family will bring us to the end of the 20th Century. The ground breaking work of painter and wood print artist Juan Alcazar will be presented to describe how modern art is changing in the remote villages of Oaxaca.

Art Project* - Paint a wood carved alebrije in Oaxacan style.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework


Homework*:

Homework (30 hours) will consist of :

1. Make a 15 minute PowerPoint presentation related to one general Mexican art topic listed below.
Emphasis should be placed on historical accuracy of the topic and how it relates to class, race, prejudice and cultural tolerance. Topics from which to choose are:

  a. Mexican Folk Art in the United States
  b. Mexican folk art toys, masks or pottery
  c. Mexican folk art as used as design interiors and restaurants
  d. Contrast several Mexican folk artists and their work

Include titles and label your disc, and submit your completed disc as homework.

2. Complete all art projects.
You may send your original artwork or send photos or digital disc of your completed work.
If you submit your artwork, make sure to label or attach identification tags your pieces.

3. Using the workshop contents, complete a 1 week lesson plan based on their grade level curriculum, using the applicable state standards for your project. This may be integrated and married into a lesson plan using Open Court or other mandated curriculum courses if you like.

4. Participants will choose a category of folk art featured in this workshop, i.e. pottery, toys, masks, recycled materials, etc. Prepare a classroom art project where students create art "in the style" of the Mexican folk art of that category. Use your imagination for this project! Include an internet bibliography of appropriate sites for your students to visit to research this artist.
Implement the project. Take photos of your students' work and submit with your homework package.

5. Complete an Evaluation of this course.

6. Submit all homework, #1 through #6, within 30 days of the last class. All items must be mailed to: Reign Trading Co. Angela Villalba, 3838 Walnut Grove Ave, Rosemead, CA 91770. Make sure to fully identify yourself, the class taken and include the homework worksheet with your box. Include a check for $10 if you want your items returned.


La Malice, Guadalupe and the Soldaderas of Pancho Villa's Camp


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ~ Multi-Cultural Specific (1 Salary Point)

*Subject to change

This course will give teachers an overview of 600 years of Mexican history, focusing on major historical personalities and events starting with the Native indigenous tribes, Conquest of Mexico by Hernan Cortez, Colonial Period, Independence, Texas Rebellion, French Occupation, dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz, Revolution, Post-Revolution period and the roots of the modern state. Women's history, geography, economic trivia, regional indigenous ethnic group history, as well as the importance of Mexican movie history, will tie these topics to the California Content Standards in visual arts, social studies, history and multi-cultural programming K-12.

Attendance: Participants will attend two eight-hour weekend workshops or four four-hour weekday workshops AND complete 30 hours of homework within 30 days from the end of the class. Classes will be fun, fast paced, information packed with lots of slides, video presentations and unique art projects. Punctuality is appreciated!

PowerPoint: Teachers will learn how to make PowerPoint presentations for use in their classes. Digital camera is necessary for the homework, so make arrangements for a camera or borrow one from a friend or from your school before class begins. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed. Most schools have this available to teachers.

Art projects*: Jaguar mask with mirror eyes, Guadalupe Independence standards (flags), two dances, classroom Aztec cooking. *art projects subject to change.

Teachers will receive an informative notebook.

Locations of Workshops: The Los Angeles Arboretum is co-sponsoring this workshop. Registration will include entrance to the beautiful grounds of the Arboretum. Class will be held in a large community room and there is ample parking. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to class time.

Lunch: Bring a brown bag lunch as we will have a "working lunch" which will count towards class hours. An assortment of sodas and waters will be provided.

Cost: $95 and a materials charge of $35 to cover special art projects, cooking and archeological dig.

Pre-registration is required and can be completed by using our secure internet shopping cart. You will be sent a class confirmation, credit card receipt for return of packing charge, map to the Arboretum and a class checklist by return mail. Receipts for reimbursement or taxes will be provided--please keep them-- as we cannot provide receipts after class date! Class space is limited so early enrollment is advised.

Cancellations may be made up to 7 days prior to class date. Refund will be made minus a $25 service charge. No refunds will be given for cancellations that occur with less than 7 days prior notice.

A "Mercado" table will be set up for those wanting to purchase books, videos, folk art, papel picado banners, sugar skull molds and decorating supplies and educational materials for your classrooms or homework projects. Cash or credit cards accepted.

Course Objectives:

1. Learn an abbreviated history of Mexico, highlighted by important Mexican personalities, geography, indigenous, ethnic and women's history and how Mexico has been influenced by Europe and the United States. Focus on Mexican political and patriotic symbols and the art of the post-Revolutionary period, including the Mexican movie industry, which was used as a vehicle for national unification.

2. Investigate ways to use history to teach other disciplines. Recognize the contributions of religious, Iberian, indigenous, ethnic and political Mexican history. Learn about the particular histories of significant Mexican personalities in history and how they overcame class struggle and racial prejudice to express themselves, their cultural identity and their political commentary. Discuss the sub-ethnic cultures of the Chinese, Africans and European immigrants and their contributions to Mexico.

3. Learn methods of using PowerPoint presentations to make interesting & effective classroom presentations. Digital camera is required. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed.

4. Learn effective methods of using dance, art and cooking projects to reinforce and cultivate cultural pride and stimulate discussion about how racial stereotypes originate. Learn authentic classroom activities and strategies that will counter stereotypes, create cultural tolerance and an appreciation for Mexican culture.

5. This course is designed to provide participants with a better understanding of how Mexican history can be used in a curriculum for social studies, English language arts, visual arts or multi-cultural studies. In addition, participants will utilize the California Content Standards to design interdisciplinary and thematic lessons for use with their student populations including English language learners (ELL), standard English learners, culturally diverse and special needs students.

Course Outline: (Full day, 8 hour classes will complete sessions A&B the first day and C&D the next meeting day. If you choose a 4 hour format, one session will be completed each day)

Morning Session
Pre-Conquest to Colonial Period.

History, life and culture of the Aztecs, Maya, Zapotec and other ancient cultures will be examined and their subsequent domination by the Conquest of Hernan Cortez. Legends and fact about the Malinche will be revealed. Customs, burial traditions, human sacrifice, architecture and the marvels of the pre-Conquest Indian civilizations will be discussed.

Since Archeology was so important in uncovering this ancient information, we will demonstrate a hands-on archeological site dig for students 5-12 grade. Discuss the importance of indigenous foods, including corn. We will have a cooking demonstration of making amaranth for the classroom.

Archeological Dig* Special hands-on project - Theories from unearthed relics.

Cooking project* - Amaranth-food of the Aztecs.

Lunch - Demonstrate art project during working lunch period.

Afternoon Session
Mexico 1510 - 1850

Art Project* - Start the afternoon session with an explanation of the Aztec Jaguar and it's symbolism throughout
history. Participants will make a papier mache jaguar mask with mirrored eyes.

After lunch, the subject matter will focus on the Spanish dominance, the Viceroy period, Independence from Spain and the use of the Virgin of Guadalupe as a patriotic symbol of Independence. Story of the China Poblana will be explained.

A quick discussion of the Mexican War, border disputes with the U.S. will be discussed. Women's contributions to the Independence movement will be highlighted, as well as the writings of Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, Latin America's most famous woman writer, owner of the largest book collection in Latin America and victim of the Mexican Inquisition.

Art project - Guadalupe standards - parade banners

This session begins with the history of Benito Juaraz, the influence of Abraham Lincoln on Mexico
and the U.S. Civil War. Mexico leaps into the modern Industrial Revolution age with Porfirio Diaz at the helm. Advantages and disadvantages of his forty year dictatorship will be discussed.

The day will conclude with a technical PowerPoint lesson designed to demonstrate how to make these effective presentations for the classroom.

Conclusion/ Discussion of Homework Assignment & PowerPoint presentations.

Morning Session
Mexican Revolution - 1910 to 1921

Rare film of Mexico's 1910 Centennial celebration will be shown as well as early Mexican photography of the 19th century. We will continue with the Porfiriato.

Dance project* - Listen to and dance the Danzon music of the Mexican Victorian age.

The Mexican Revolution was the first Revolution in Latin America. We will learn about the causes, goals and important historical figures that shaped it: Pancho Villa, Emiliano Zapata, Victoriano Huerta and Francisco Madero. Old photography of the Cassasola archive will be shown. Video clip of the first movie of the Mexican Revolution,

"Aya, En El Rancho Grande" will be shown…

Dance project* - Learn the "corrido" dance of Pancho Villa's campsite as well as the guitar chords to play the famous song, "La Adelita". It's a significant song about the heroic women soldiers of the Mexican Revolution.


Cooking project
* - homemade tortillas and beans.

Lunch - Watch participant's homework PowerPoint presentations which was first week's homework.

Afternoon Session
Post - Revolution to the Modern State - 1920 to 1945

PowerPoint presentation on my book, Mexican Calendar Girls, showing original vintage calendar art followed by discussion of commercial Mexican graphic arts and how it was used as a tool of national identity in the post-Revolution era.

Post-Revolution achievements in land reform and a more modern political system will be discussed. Creation of the PRI party. Mexico becomes more and more aligned with the United States as we move towards WWII, and played an important economic and strategic role in protecting the U.S. from communist intrusion. A focus on the Mexican agricultural workers, the ejido (national land reform) program of the post-Revolution and the U.S. migrant farm labor history will be addressed.

Mexico starts to shape herself in the image of the United States with commercialism, increases in US imports of luxury goods, the completion of the Pan American highway and border town popularity springs up as Prohibition sweeps through the U.S. Discuss the post-Revolution US consumerism, "Coca-colization" of Mexico and its subsequent religious applications. Participants will understand the most important political and historical Mexican holidays, Cinco de Mayo, Independence Day and Revolution Day. We will end with current political topics of Mexican elections and immigration issues.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework

Homework*:

Homework (30 hours) will consist of :

1. Make a 15 minute PowerPoint presentation related to one general Mexican historical topic listed below.
Emphasis should be placed on historical accuracy of the topic. Make special efforts to relate your topic to how it relates to class and race prejudice and cultural tolerance. Topics from which to choose are:

  a. Day in the life of an Aztec… (or any other ancient tribe),
  b. Day in the life of a famous person in Mexican history,
  c. Day in the life of a Soldadera in the Mexican Revolution,
  d. Compare several Mexican presidents or political parties and show their philosophical and policy differences.

Include titles and label your PowerPoint disc, and submit your completed disc as homework.

2. Complete all art projects in class.

3. Using the workshop contents, complete a 1 week lesson plan based on your grade level curriculum, using the applicable state standards for your project. This may be integrated and combined into a lesson plan using Open Court or other mandated curriculum courses if you like.

4. Explore the many facets of Post-Revolution Mexico - Participants will choose a famous Mexican personality or event which occurred in the modern post-Revolutionary period featured in this workshop. Prepare a classroom project where students learn about this topic. Use your imagination for this! Include an internet bibliography of appropriate sites for your students to visit and research. Implement the project. Take photos of your students' work and submit with your homework package.

5. Complete an Evaluation of this course.

6. Submit all homework, #1 through #6, within 30 days of the last class. All items must be mailed to: Reign Trading Co. Angela Villalba, 3838 Walnut Grove Ave, Rosemead, CA 91770. Make sure to fully identify yourself, the class taken and include the homework worksheet with your box. Include a check for $10 if you want your items returned.



Chocolate, Corn & Fiesta: The Essence of Mexico

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ~ Multi-Cultural Specific (1 Salary Point)

*Subject to change

This course will explore the many Holidays of Mexico, their historical and cultural significance and how they are celebrated in the United States. The concept of "fiesta" and "guelaguetza" as a cultural phenomenon will be included.How does the United States and its immigrant population share and preserve these traditions. What were the histories and reasons behind these celebrations? What Mexican holidays are celebrated by Latino students in Los Angeles?

Most Mexican holidays have distinctive regional culinary specialties which have been based on indigenous native foods. Thus, the fascinating histories of chocolate, corn, coffee and chiles will be presented. These themes will be tied to the California Content Standards in visual arts, social studies, history, science and multi-cultural programming K-12.

Attendance: Participants will attend two eight-hour weekend workshops (participate in class and complete all art projects) AND complete required homework within 30 days from the end of the class. Classes will be fun, fast paced, information packed with lots of slides, video presentations and unique art projects. Punctuality is appreciated!

PowerPoint: Teachers will learn how to make PowerPoint presentations for use in their classes. Digital camera is necessary for the homework, so make arrangements for a camera or borrow one from a friend or from your school before class begins. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed. Most schools have this available to teachers.

Art projects*: corn husk dolls, Day of the Dead craft, mask or rattle, papel picado, tortilla art, various cooking demonstrations & tasting!

Teachers will receive an informative notebook.

Locations of Workshops: The Los Angeles Arboretum is co-sponsoring this workshop. Registration will include entrance to the beautiful grounds of the Arboretum. Class will be held in a large community room and there is ample parking. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to class time.

Lunch: Bring a brown bag lunch as we will have a "working lunch" which will count towards class hours. An assortment of sodas and waters will be provided.

Cost: $95 and a materials charge of $35 to cover special art & cooking projects.

Pre-registration is required and can be completed by using our secure internet shopping cart. You will be sent a class confirmation, credit card receipt for return of packing charge, map to the Arboretum and a class checklist by return mail. Receipts for reimbursement or taxes will be provided--please keep them-- as we cannot provide receipts after class date! Class space is limited so early enrollment is advised.

Cancellations may be made up to 7 days prior to class date. Refund will be made minus a $25 service charge. No refunds will be given for cancellations that occur with less than 7 days prior notice.

A "Mercado" table will be set up for those wanting to purchase books, videos, folk art, papel picado banners, sugar skull molds and decorating supplies and educational materials for your classrooms or homework projects. Cash or credit cards accepted.

Course Objectives:

1. Learn about the Mexican holiday calendar, starting with Three Kings Day in January, and covering Carnival, May 1, Cinco de Mayo, Easter, Teachers Day, Mother's Day, Children's Day, Independence Day, Revolution Day, Day of the Dead, Guadalupe's Birthday, Christmas, Wedding-Birthday and Saint's Day traditions and New Years.

2. Investigate ways to use these holiday traditions to teach other disciplines and recognize the contributions of indigenous, ethnic and multi-cultural themes in teaching tolerance of Mexican culture. Learn authentic classroom activities and strategies that will counter stereotypes, create cultural tolerance and an appreciation for Mexican culture. Learn the traditional folk art crafts associated with the holidays.

3. Learn about the particular histories of indigenous foods and the effect of exports on trade routes, culinary traditions around the world and economics, past and present. Discuss the significant contributions women and indigenous people have made. Learn effective methods of using art and cooking projects to reinforce and cultivate cultural pride.

4. Learn methods of using PowerPoint presentations to make interesting & effective classroom presentations. Digital camera is required. Access to PowerPoint software is also needed.

5. This course is designed to provide participants with a better understanding of how Mexican holidays can be used in a curriculum for social studies, English language arts, visual arts or multi-cultural studies. In addition, participants will utilize the California Content Standards to design interdisciplinary and thematic lessons for use with their student populations including English language learners (ELL), standard English learners, culturally diverse and special needs students.

Course Outline:

First Morning Session
Corn and Winter Holidays

Concept of the cultural importance of "Fiesta" will be discussed, as well as the Winter holidays of Guadalupe's Birthday, Christmas, New Year's and King's Day… Minor holidays such as Night of the Radishes will be mentioned. Traditional holiday foods like the rosca de reyes and tamales will be discussed.


Art project* - hands-on making of corn husk wreath or tortilla art.
Food - Aztec pre-cursor to Corn… Amaranth. Tortilla making.

Lunch - Show first half of movie: Like Water for Chocolate.

Afternoon Session
Chocolate and Spring Holidays

After lunch, we'll cover Carnival, Lent/Easter, Semana Santa, Jewish Mexican traditions, Teacher/Children/ Mother's Day Celebrations followed by a Show & Tell of Angela's holiday folk art collection.

Art project* - Masks and/or rattles

Native chocolate of Mexico and Central America will be traced from Aztec times to modern day and its impact on world economies and international cuisine.

The day will conclude with a technical PowerPoint lesson designed to demonstrate how to make effective PowerPoint presentations for the classroom.

Food* - Making Mexican holiday Chocolate in the classroom.

Conclusion / Discussion of Homework Assignment & PowerPoint presentations.


Second Morning Session
Coffee - Summer Holidays

PowerPoint presentation of the history of Coffee will be shown. Since there aren't many holidays
in the Summer, emphasis will be given to the Guelaguetza in Oaxaca, wedding
traditions in cities and rural indigenous villages, birthdays. quinceneras and saint's days.
Teacher's will learn how to play Mexican Happy Birthday, in Spanish, on the guitar.

Art project* - Papel Picado paper-cut banners.


Food* - Demonstration and discussion on Mexican sweet breads and candies

Lunch - Watch second half of Like Water for Chocolate. Discuss symbolism.


Afternoon Session
Chile - Fall Holidays

Rural harvest celebrations and fall holidays will be discussed as well as the history of chile as well as other native foods of Mexico and their cultural and culinary contributions. Fall holidays include:
16 de Septiembre, Revolution Day and Day of the Dead. PowerPoint presentation on chile will be viewed.

Watch a video of Day of the Dead in Oaxaca before making and decorating sugar skulls.
Discussion will focus on Day of the Dead foods in different regions, their significance and symbolism.
Directions for a variety of celebration foods and how to prepare them will be offered.

Art Project* - Day of the Dead sugar skull decorating/ alternative crafts with the molds like chocolate, plaster of paris,
soap and candles.

Food* - Day of the Dead foods: Mole and pan de muerto.

Homework*:

Homework (30 hours) will consist of :

1. Make a 15 minute PowerPoint presentation related to one general Mexican art topic listed below.
Emphasis should be placed on historical accuracy of the topic and how it relates to class, race and cultural tolerance. Topics from which to choose are:

  a. History of chocolate and Mexican sweets (include chewing gum?)
  b. History of Corn, Culture of Corn and current corn consumption - genetically engineered seeds.
  c. Mexican holidays (choose those that suit your grade and curriculum)
  d. Trade routes and how indigenous foods made their way around the world... how foods influenced other cuisines.
..e. Aztec, Mayan or pre-Columbian Food Channel show, featuring foods and

Include titles and label your disc, and submit your completed disc as homework. Make sure your disc opens on a second P.C. before you submit it. Discs that do not open, will not be given credit.

2. Complete all art projects in class.

3. Using the workshop contents, complete a 1 week lesson plan based on their grade level curriculum, using the applicable state standards for your project. This may be integrated and married into a lesson plan using Open Court or other mandated curriculum courses if you like. Participants will choose a holiday featured in this workshop. Prepare a classroom art project, program or fiesta based upon this holiday. Use your imagination for this project! Include an internet bibliography of appropriate sites for your students to visit to research this artist.

4. Complete an Evaluation of this course.

5. Submit all homework, #1 through #6, within 30 days of the last class. All items must be mailed to: Reign Trading Co. Angela Villalba, 3838 Walnut Grove Ave, Rosemead, CA 91770. Make sure to fully identify yourself, the class taken and include the homework worksheet with your box. Include a check for $10 if you want your items returned.


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